Broadcast journalism

Broadcast Journalism School Study journalism with the New York Film Academy's Broadcast Journalism School, dedicated to training the next generation of journalists for the realities of 21st century journalism. In the past few decades, the focus of journalism has shifted to become an increasingly visual medium.

Broadcast journalism

Description[ edit ] Broadcast articles can be written as "packages", "readers", " voice-overs " VO and " sound on tape " SOT. A "sack" is an edited set of video clips for a news story and is common on television.

It is typically narrated by a reporter. It is a story with audio, video, graphics and video effects. The news anchoror presenter, usually reads a "lead-in" introduction before the package is aired and may conclude the story with additional information, called a "tag". A "reader" is an article read without accompanying video or sound.

Sometimes an "over the shoulder digital on-screen graphic " is added. A voice-over, or VO, is a video article narrated by the anchor. Sound on tape, or SOT, is sound or video usually recorded in the field.

Degree Requirements for a Broadcast Journalism Career

It is usually an interview or soundbite. Radio was the first medium for broadcast journalism. Many of the first radio stations were co-operative community radio ventures not making a profit. Later, radio advertising to pay for programs was pioneered in radio. Later still, television displaced radio and newspapers as the main news sources for most of the public in industrialized countries.

Some of the programming on radio is locally produced and some is broadcast by a radio network, for example, by syndication.

The "talent" professional voices talk to the audience, including reading the news. People tune in to hear engaging radio personalities, music, and information.

In radio news, stories include speech soundbites, the recorded sounds of events themselves, and the anchor or host.

Some radio news might run for just four minutes, but contain 12—15 stories. These new bulletins must balance the desire for a broad overview of current events with the audience's limited capacity to focus on a large number of different stories.

Large media conglomerates such as Clear Channel Communications own most of the radio stations in the United States. That has resulted in more " niche " formats and the sharing of resources within clusters of stations, de-emphasizing local news and information.

There has been concern over whether this concentration serves the public. The opposition says that the range of political views expressed is greatly narrowed and that local concerns are neglected, including local emergencies, for which communication is critical. History[ edit ] When radio first became popular, it was not used as a source of information; rather, people listened to the radio solely for entertainment purposes.

He stayed in London throughout the war and was the first to report on events such as bombings in London and updated the people on Hitler's reign. Murrow gained his fame mainly after reporting on Hitler 's German army annexing Austria. Many Americans relied on his broadcasts throughout the war to gain information about the war.

People found out about the bombing through President Roosevelt's broadcast interrupting their daily programming. It set Americans on edge, and people began to rely more heavily on the radio for major announcements throughout World War II.

Informative radio continued while television reporting also began to take flight. Throughout the 40's and 50's television news sources grew, but radio still dominated. It wasn't until John F. Kennedy 's assassination in that television newscasting took off.

Radio could only capture the sound of the event, but television showed people the true horror of the assassination.Official page for Broadcast Journalism Competitive Event. Includes study guides, quizzes, practice tests, competencies, guidelines to help you prepare for the Broadcast Journalism Competitive Event.

Broadcast Journalism School

NYFA's Broadcast Journalism Program is offered at our New York Campus only. Broadcast Journalism School Study journalism with the New York Film Academy's Broadcast Journalism School, dedicated to training the next generation of journalists for the realities of 21st century journalism.

Our broadcast classes allow students to develop and expand their reporting, production and storytelling skills in both audio and video. Please note: The classes listed here represent recent offerings at the Journalism School. Official page for Broadcast Journalism Competitive Event.

Includes study guides, quizzes, practice tests, competencies, guidelines to help you prepare for the Broadcast Journalism Competitive Event. Broadcast journalism is the field of news and journals which are "broadcast", that is, published by electrical methods instead of the older methods, such as printed newspapers and posters.

Broadcast methods include radio (via air, cable, and Internet), television (via air, cable, and Internet) and the World Wide Web. As broadcast and investigative journalism continues to evolve in the 21st century, stay up to date on the latest developments in the industry through our Broadcast Journalism School’s how-to guides, Q&A’s and interviews, and articles detailing the cutting edge trends.

Broadcast journalism
Broadcast Journalism Career